1 Sep 2013

You know I love words that don’t translate into English very easily. Turns out I also love little illustrations of such words!
There are several more, and they are all worth a look. 

You know I love words that don’t translate into English very easily. Turns out I also love little illustrations of such words!

There are several more, and they are all worth a look

24 Jul 2013

6) Nauseous
What you may think it means: to feel sick
What it actually means: to cause nausea

When you eat too much ice cream and declare to your mom or the nearest adult, “I feel nauseous,” what you’re actually saying is that you are causing people around you to feel sick. Thanks, jerk. (For the record, “I’m nauseated” is the way to go.)

10 Words That You’ve Probably Been Misusing

People misuse nauseous all the time. I don’t because I’m awesome. Actually I don’t because I think it was in some movie? I can’t remember which but one character explains the proper usage to another. Thank god for movies or we’d never learn anything!

18 Jul 2013

This is the funniest linguistics thing I’ve seen in a while. Brazilian kids are learning English by correcting celebrities’ tweets. And they are so sweet about it!

This is the funniest linguistics thing I’ve seen in a while. Brazilian kids are learning English by correcting celebrities’ tweets. And they are so sweet about it!

27 Jun 2013

Is “cracker” a “racial” term? The correct answer: Shut up, cracker.

Will You White Crackers Please Stop Whining for the Love of God

Love it. 

25 Jun 2013

Mansplaining 101: How to Discuss Politics and Feminism Without Acting Like a Jackass

A while ago we covered how to argue like a dude, now we have a handy guide for dudes about how to not argue like a dude. You can do it, dudes!


14 Jun 2013

Prairie dogs are talking shit about you.

Apparently prairie dogs are judging you. Besides being the nerdiest video ever, this is very interesting.


13 Jun 2013

Grammar Lessons With Food! 

I want wine to give me compliments. Usually it just judges me. “Another glass, Rascal?” Yes, jerk wine!

(Source: youtube.com)

8 May 2013

Two experiments are reported in which subjects viewed films of automobile accidents and then answered questions about events occurring in the films. The question, “About how fast were the cars going when they smashed into each other?” elicited higher estimates
of speed than questions which used the verbs collided, bumped, contucted, or hit in place of smashed. On a retest one week later, those subjects who received the verb smashed were more likely to say “yes” to the question, “Did you see any broken glass?”, even though broken glass was not present in the film. These results are consistent with the view that the questions asked subsequent to an event can cause a reconstruction in one’s memory of that event.

The Scientific Equivalent of “When did you stop beating your wife?”

The quote is from the original study and not the post linked but you know I would never link you to a long-ass study—much less a PDF of a long-ass study.

26 Apr 2013

Demonstrably: don’t be scared.

Thought for the day: demonstrably is a very angry sounding word. But do not be afraid, it won’t hurt you. It just means “in an obvious and provable manner.” But I guess that would scare a lot of people actually because so many people are full of shit.

25 Apr 2013

10 Word Mix-Ups To Avoid, Presented By Bunnies

I think this post just rendered my whole blog useless.